HOT WHEELS HIGHWAY 35. HOT WHEELS


Hot Wheels Highway 35. Removing Wheel Lock Nuts.



Hot Wheels Highway 35





hot wheels highway 35






    hot wheels
  • Hot Wheels is a thirty minute Saturday morning animated television series broadcast on ABC from 1969 to 1971, under the primary sponsorship of Mattel Toys.

  • Hot Wheels is a brand of die cast toy car, introduced by American toymaker Mattel in 1968. It was the primary competitor of Matchbox until 1996, when Mattel acquired rights to the Matchbox brand from Tyco.

  • Hot Wheels is a Hardy Boys novel.





    highway 35
  • Mississippi Highway 35 (MS 35) is a state highway in Mississippi. It runs north-south for , beginning at the Louisiana/Mississippi state line and ending at a junction with Mississippi Highway 315.

  • The following highways are numbered 35: * Alberta Highway 35 *British Columbia Highway 35 * Ontario Highway 35 * Quebec Autoroute 35 *Saskatchewan Highway 35

  • State Route 35 is a north-south state route located in the southern part of the U.S. state of Georgia. The route travels from the Florida state line south of Cairo northeast to SR 32 in Ocilla. The route is cosigned with U.S. Route 319 for its entire length.











hot wheels highway 35 - I-35




I-35


I-35



I-35 is the story of David, a loner in his late 20s from New York City who suffers from blackout migraines and has a penchant for painkillers. He wakes up one morning, freezing in the backseat of his car, 1,500 miles from home, with no idea how he got there. After hearing a horrifying voicemail, he embarks on a harrowing journey through America's heartland, searching for his estranged brother and his brother's wife, while attempting to piece together his own fractured memory. Along the road, David meets a cast of odd characters who become suspects in his clouded and paranoid mind. And just as the clues begin to add up, a chance encounter at a seedy Oklahoma diner leads him to Shawna--a beautiful girl, shrouded in mystery, who escorts him down a vertiginous path to the end of the I-35 highway...where a shocking truth is revealed.

I-35 is the story of David, a loner in his late 20s from New York City who suffers from blackout migraines and has a penchant for painkillers. He wakes up one morning, freezing in the backseat of his car, 1,500 miles from home, with no idea how he got there. After hearing a horrifying voicemail, he embarks on a harrowing journey through America's heartland, searching for his estranged brother and his brother's wife, while attempting to piece together his own fractured memory. Along the road, David meets a cast of odd characters who become suspects in his clouded and paranoid mind. And just as the clues begin to add up, a chance encounter at a seedy Oklahoma diner leads him to Shawna--a beautiful girl, shrouded in mystery, who escorts him down a vertiginous path to the end of the I-35 highway...where a shocking truth is revealed.










79% (13)





[6] 100NCD70 6 105 images DSC 4368 111015 D70raw - DSC 4475 111015 D70raw-2027x729-SS3L-Smartblend




[6] 100NCD70 6 105 images DSC 4368 111015 D70raw - DSC 4475 111015 D70raw-2027x729-SS3L-Smartblend





Stitched Panorama

D70 pano

This is the farthest south that I went, just south enough to begin to see the ridge of mountains there at the right. I just wasn't interested in going down slightly further south and shooting more, I've taken shots there 5,000 times. Not even to compare with film. Let's say that having actually ridden down the whole Skyline Drive and some of the northern end of the Blue Ridge Highway I'm now somewhat nonplussed by the mountains and views on the northern end of Skyline Drive. Plus I've shot them 5,000 times. But this made for a halfway-decent capstone so I shot it once more.

Again some of the brackets were a bit hot and APP1.4 obviously wasn't smart enough to not blend in the burned-out parts.

Anyway so my takeaway from this whole odyssey of going out there and shooting this year is that a wide-angle lens on either a cheap film camera or a cheap subframe is perfectly fine for getting decent landscape shots as long as you're not looking for a ton of pixels. Heck even a halfway-decent cellphone will do fine, as long as you're just looking for something around 8x10. The BB9550 has too much NR and insufficient DR for anything larger than that viewed up-close, even on my 24" monitor at work the NR is obvious. It would be fine for an 11x17" print viewed at some reasonable distance, say 6 feet or so. Film likewise is ok if you don't have the problem above with horizon-flaring, film will just make that look worse.

I'd say that 35mm film is somewhat better than a cellphone and a match overall for a cheap p&s but not as good as even a cheap DSLR shot raw. A DSLR (shot raw and shot at low ISO yet at adequate speed) is just too clean and carries too much fine-detail for film to compete with it in the overall sense. There is no question that if you are talking about in-camera image-processing, lens-correction, NR and so forth, that most people will get better shots much more easily with a DSLR than with film, and given the price of film and time involved in processing it's a no-brainer. But then you are entirely dependent on the camera for the color and fine-detail, and quite often it just isn't realistic and you're left with...what? Well, raw-shooting is a good start. Film is an interesting option that looks better from time to time, but it does have clear limits.

The problem is that if you wrap it all up together I still am unsure whether any of this is really a better option than just getting a good fullframe and a decent pair of zoom lenses. The only thing that makes it even "debatable" is the price of a good fullframe. If you are buying a cheap DSLR to take shots, you are getting a DSLR and you have the same limitations: it's still a relatively big, heavy and bulky camera and you still have to resort to raw shooting and software-manipulation to get the best IQ. The only question is whether the IQ is acceptable if the camera only costs say $200, compared to a $2k camera. Cellphones are cellphones (and the 9550 is very good for a cellphone), point & shoots are p&shoots (and the G9 is very good for a p&s) and film is film. Cellphones will always be far more convenient to carry and shoot than any other camera, and point & shoots will always have inferior IQ compared to any other digital camera, and the good ones aren't even cheaper than decent DSLRs on eBay. Each type has serious and unique pluses and minuses, strengths and weaknesses. The only thing they really have in common is the fact that they all cost money.

And I say that if you're really into photography don't waste your time with bad gear. But that doesn't mean that it is bad because it is cheap. It is *ALSO* not good because it is *expensive*. And clearly if it is too expensive you can't really afford to buy it and shoot it. But also if it is too bad you can't afford to buy & shoot it, likewise. It's just too much of a waste of time. That's why I think that more people should shoot film, buy a cheap SLR like the 500si and a cheap film scanner like the V300 and shoot and scan your own film. Get good with film. See what you can get out of film. Then you will have a better idea of what a good digital camera should give you. And it will only cost you maybe $200 worth of hardware plus say $200 worth of decent non-IS lenses, at the *most*. And if you choose them well you will be able to shoot those same lenses on a cheap DSLR. And then you can compare them *directly* to film, and see how good your DSLR is.

And honestly at this point I would say that overall you would probably find a good p&s like the G9 or the G11 -maybe even the SX130- to be the most cost-effective and portable answer but really they still have the same problems as DSLRs (they are still big, heavy, expensive and lacking in functionality compared to a cellphone) and they still have IQ limitations compared to DSLRs (they still have funky color because they are 10-bit cameras) and they still are just not wide enoug











51




51





Shot quickly through the window as we all careened down Highway 35 toward Ames. I don't know what the 51' stands for. It didn't seem that long to me.









hot wheels highway 35








hot wheels highway 35




South Dakota Highway 35






Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. South Dakota Highway 35 was a state route located in southeast South Dakota. This route was established around 1935, as a renumbering of South Dakota Highway 27. At that time, SD 27's northern terminus was at U.S. Highway 18; SD 35 was extended north to South Dakota Highway 42. The route was deleted in 1976. The segment south of U.S. 18 became part of a split South Dakota Highway 25; the segment to the north is unnumbered.










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